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4th Grade Research Paper Introduction Template

How to Write an Introduction

As the saying goes, there’s just one chance to make a first impression. For writers, that chance is in the introduction of an essay or text. If a writer can interest and engage a reader immediately, the writer has made a good first impression. Our worksheets on writing an engaging and interesting essay introduction are below. Simple click on the title to view more about the worksheet or to download a PDF. They are free for home or classroom use. Check out all of our writing worksheets!

Introducing a Topic: Giving Information

How do you name a pet or describe a good book at the library? In this activity, students introduce different topics based on prompts.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
W.1.2, W.2.2, W.3.2.A

Introducing a Topic: Opinion Writing

Students, especially beginning writers, sometimes have trouble getting started. This activity helps them learn how to introduce topics.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
W.1.1, W.2.1, W.3.1.A

Introducing a Topic: Telling a Story

This activity helps students learn how to clearly introduce a topic in a story they are telling. In this activity, students will write the setting of the story.

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12, Kindergarten & 1st Grade
CCSS Code(s):
W.1.3, W.2.3, W.3.3.A

How to Write a Thesis Statement

This activity helps students develop a strong thesis statement for their essays by providing practice writing sample statements.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, 9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1, W.7.1, W.8.1, W.9-10.1, W.11-12.1

How to Write an Introduction: Bridge Building Activity

This activity is designed to help students learn about writing introductions through a fun bridge building activity to join the lead noun card and thesis statement card.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, 9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1, W.7.1, W.8.1, W.9-10.1, W.11-12.1

How to Write an Introduction: Different Leads

This is a fun, creative activity where students explore ways to include factoids, stories, metaphors and more to create “hooks”. A great activity to help students develop strong introductions.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, 9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1, W.7.1, W.8.1, W.9-10.1

How to Write an Introduction: Lead Types

Creating an attention-grabbing lead isn’t always easy but it’s very rewarding to students when they are able to create engaging introductions. This activity provides great practice to build better introductions!

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, 9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1, W.7.1, W.8.1, W.9-10.1

How to Write an Introduction: Lead, Bridge, and Thesis

Let’s combine it all! This activity helps students use thesis statements, bridges and leads to write strong essay introductions.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, 9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1, W.7.1, W.8.1, W.9-10.1

How to Write an Introduction: Write a Complete Introduction

This activity helps students bring together what they’ve learned to write a complete introduction, including the lead, bridge, and thesis statement.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, 9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1, W.7.1, W.8.1, W.9-10.1

The introduction is the first thing readers read. It's the part that needs to capture their attention and make them want to keep reading. It also helps them focus on what they will be expected to understand or agree with at the end of the writing. Writing and introduction and conclusion can be one of the hardest part of writing and therefore, it comes at the end of the process, when writers have developed their draft and have a stronger sense of what they want their readers to understand.

In order to write a strong introduction, a writer might use one of these techniques:

  1. Tell a story about one person who benefited from this information in the essay. You can use the words, “What (that person) and others need to know is that…”
  2. “Many people (don’t know, don’t think, don’t realize) but I’ve (now realize, think its important)…”
  3. “Did you know…? Have you ever (wondered/wanted to know)…? I have found…”
  4. Raise a question that people ask…and show that this essay will answer it. “Many people wonder … You will learn…”

I then ask students to share with a partner, one way they might write their introduction. They can use one of these ideas to try out.

Students need to also think deeply about the type of conclusion they will write. The writer wants the reader to know that they have been effected by the essay and that they now think or understand something in a different way. Writers do this by using one of the examples below:

  1. (My thesis) is true. If my thesis is true than so is…
  2. I understand that…
  3. This makes me think…
  4. I believe that when I …, I feel…
  5. Other people should care about this because …
  6. This is important because…

I also ask students to pick one and try it out with a partner before returning to their own independent work.

When they return to work on their essay, I suggest they try a few different examples. They never know which one will work the best. Just like before, they need to practice a few different introductions and conclusions, asking themselves what way is most clear and convincing.