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Narrative Essay Topics Igcse English Past

Narrative Essay Topics

In a narrative essay, the writer tells a story about his/her personal experience. However, treating a narrative essay like an interesting bedtime story would be a mistake. It goes further. In this type of essay, the writer should speak about his/her experience within a specific context, such as a lesson learned. With a narrative essay, the writer not only entertains the reader but also teaches him, illustrating his point of view with a real-life example.


If you are assigned to write a narrative essay, here are some narrative writing prompts:

NARRATIVE ESSAY WRITING


How to Choose a Narrative Essay Topic?

Choosing an interesting topic and thinking over short story ideas is particularly important. When writing a narrative essay you should think about your life experience in the framework of the assignment’s theme, you would like to speak about. You should always remember that even a tiny event or incident could serve a plot for an interesting narrative story. The point is that it should convey a meaning; it should be a kind of instructive story.

There is a number of helpful techniques helping to invent an essay topic. If you don’t have a clue what experience to describe, you can brainstorm with your friends, surf the Internet or use this list of sample narrative essay topics.


Before getting started to choose a topic from the list provided by our writers, let’s read one of the narrative essay examples:

NARRATIVE ESSAY EXAMPLE


In case you already have the topic to write about but need help with your essay, you can contact our essay writing service in UK to order a custom-written narrative essay with www.essaymasters.co.uk! Our professional writers are available 24/7! 

Below is the great list of short story ideas:

TOP 70 Narrative Essay Topics

  1. If I could go back in time.
  2. If I could change anything in the history, what would I choose?
  3. The time I saw the weirdest thing in my life.
  4. My most frightening experience.
  5. One thing I’m afraid to lose.
  6. If I could change one thing about me.
  7. If I had a billion dollars.
  8. If I could stop the time.
  9. The most beautiful thing in the world for me.
  10. The most pleasant sound for me.
  11. My first day at a new school.
  12. The time I lost my friend.
  13. The time I got a new friend.
  14. My first day at a new job.
  15. My most disastrous day ever.
  16. My happiest day ever.
  17. The most irritating things in my life.
  18. An experience that left me disillusioned.
  19. How I met my fear.
  20. The moment I overcome my phobia.
  21. The achievement I’m proud of.
  22. My most dangerous experience.
  23. The journey that has changed me.
  24. The experience that taught me how appearance can be deceiving.
  25. My act of heroism.
  26. My act of cowardice.
  27. A thing I would like to change in my past.
  28. My first month of living on my own.
  29. The most successful day in my life.
  30. The time I was wrong about the person.
  31. My sudden act of a kindness.
  32. What my younger sibling taught me.
  33. A time when I felt that I’m experiencing a historic event.
  34. How I started relationships.
  35. The worst quarrel with my mother.
  36. An experience I thought I would never have.
  37. The biggest risk I’ve ever taken.
  38. Why do I like being alone?
  39. The hardest decision I’ve ever made.
  40. The hardest thing I’ve ever done.
  41. What challenges have I overcome?
  42. How do I relieve stress?
  43. What do I do when I feel depressed.
  44. 5 everyday problems that bother me.
  45. Who inspires me and why.
  46. Whom would I ask to come if I had my own Talk-show?
  47. People that have changed my life.
  48. Books or movies that have changed my world view.
  49. Devices playing the biggest role in my life.
  50. Side effects of my digital life.
  51. One day or week without an access to the Internet.
  52. What my profile in social networks tells about me.
  53. What music inspires me.
  54. What music can change my mood?
  55. What movies inspire me.
  56. What role television plays in my life.
  57. What television shows have mattered to me?
  58. What reality-show I would like to participate in.
  59. What memorable poetry have I learned?
  60. What books teach me.
  61. Why do I keep (or don’t keep) a diary or journal?
  62. What words or phrases I don’t like to use.
  63. The time I learned that grammar is necessary.
  64. The greatest conversation of my life.
  65. The teacher who inspired me.
  66. The role clubs and teams play in my life.
  67. My long-time passion.
  68. What superhero power I would like to have.
  69. Why I like (or don’t like) cooking.
  70. Waiting in line story.

More about a narrative essay:

NARRATIVE ESSAY OUTLINE


Have you already chosen a topic for your narrative essay? If not, feel free to contact our professional writers as they will offer a lot of topics to write about. Place an order for getting an instant quote for your narrative essay.

11+ Essay Writing

Independent School Essay Writing Next Page.

With thanks to various 11+ Forum members, particularly Freya, for their helpful posts on this topic.

Children often feel that the essay element of the 11+ is a monumental task, and parents preparing them for it often feel the same way! We hope that the advice on this page will help your and your child to break the task down into manageable pieces, and also provide you with some useful shortcuts.

On this section you will also find advice on essay writing from an 11+ veteran who took several Independent School exams. The advice given is particularly helpful for longer essays and for more challenging topics and tests.

The essay test may be as little as 20 minutes or as long as 50 minutes, and may be factual or fiction. There is usually a choice of titles, but it is important to check the type of topics that have come up in the tests for each school in the past. There are some examples below of essay titles that have come up in past 11+ tests around the country to get you started.

Examiners in different areas may have different priorities. In some areas they will mainly be interested in the content of the work, rather than demanding good spelling or punctuation. In other areas accurate grammar, punctuation and spelling may be required as well. All examiners will be looking for one key thing: the “beginning, middle and end” that most children find so difficult to achieve in essays.

If your child does not excel at fiction writing and you know for certain that they will have a choice of factual or fiction topics, you could focus on developing their ability to write a persuasive factual essay rather than battling uphill with creative writing.

Planning

Learning good planning technique is essential to success in an 11+ essay. The elements that need to be planned are:

  • Who are the characters? Can you describe them?
  • Where is the story set?
  • What is the plot – what will happen in the story?
  • How will the story begin?
  • What will happen in the middle?
  • How will it end?

With very limited time for planning an essay in the 11+ a child must learn to make rough notes on all of these points within a very tight timescale. In some areas the children are given 5 minutes specifically to plan their essay, but in other areas that time is included in the time allotted for the whole task, and speed is critical.

Building up a “bank” of characters and settings that your child can fall back is well worth doing. Typical characters might be: a criminal; an old lady; a spooky person; a scary man, a nice friend, etc. Settings might include: A rocky seashore; a dark wood; an old, empty house, etc.

To develop the “beginning, middle and end” balance, you can work out how much your child is likely to write in the allotted time and then start to rule 3 sections on their page, one short one, a longer one and a third short one. They then have to complete the “beginning” within the space allowed in the first section, fit the middle into the longer section and the ending must take up the whole of the last section

Even after extensive practice a child may still find that they are running out of time. It is well worth preparing some “emergency endings”, and never, ever falling back on the stock phrase: “And then I woke up and realised it was all a dream”. It is an ending that makes the hearts of teachers and examiners sink to their boots!

Vocabulary

Plenty of adjectives and adverbs will make for interesting writing, and you can help your child to make “stock lists” of appropriate words for different settings. For example, if the story is a “spooky” story, help them to think of dark, scary adjectives and adverbs.

As time goes on it is also worth helping a child come up with “stock phrases” that can fit into almost any essay, such as:

  • Linking mood to weather: Tears like the rain/waterfalls; Eyes bruised like dark clouds; Heart beating as raindrops thundered; Eyes twinkling like dew on fresh grass.
  • Descriptions of surroundings: Sweet, cloying scent; Patchwork of autumn leaves – vibrant reds, ochres, etc; Shafts of sunshine dappling; Trees whispering to each other; Angry water seething and boiling.
  • Descriptions of being frightened: Being chased, hiding and anticipating being found.

Essay topics

For creative writing, the topics set for 11+ essays tend to have the same common themes, and it is worth having a “stock” story that can be used in each of these settings:

  • Being lost, scared or alone
  • Doing something exciting or achieving something (’the best day of my life was . . . ’)
  • Animals
  • Taking a holiday
  • Having an adventure
  • Being in a city or in the countryside

These are topics that have come up on past 11+ papers around the country, with a few additional titles contributed by our 11+ Forum members:

  • A surprising spy
  • Removed
  • Break time at school
  • Write a story about a lost key
  • Is life too hectic to enjoy fully?
  • My favourite memories
  • A farewell party
  • An attempted robbery
  • It was a while before I realised my cat could talk
  • Moving Houses
  • I don’t know what that noise was …..
  • The new pupils
  • The storm
  • The Burglary
  • My Brilliant Idea
  • Visiting Relatives
  • The Balloon
  • The school rules
  • Panic
  • A place that inspires you
  • Your favourite day out
  • Are Jamie Oliver’s new school dinners a good idea.
  • What makes a good friend?
  • Describe the scene and the activities at a bus station.
  • What are your reactions to discipline? How far is it necessary both at home and at school?
  • How does the life of your generation differ from that of your grandparents?
  • Discuss the good and bad effects of competition in modern life
  • Is life too hectic to enjoy fully?

Independent School Essay Writing Next Page.